Jo’s Monday Walk: A Visit to Sissinghurst

A summer in the UK would not be complete for me without a visit to Sissinghurst Garden, one of my favorites! This is the garden that Vita Sackville-West and her husband, Harold, made home. Vita was also a friend of Virginia Wolfe, Vanessa Bell and the Bloomsbury Group, which I have written about in previous…

#MyGloriousGardens: The Garden of Ellen Terry

This week for my bit for #MyGlorious Gardens we are visiting Smallhythe Place near Tenderden, Kent. Smallhythe Place, the home of Ellen Terry, is located on a rural road, near Tenterden in Kent. Coming from a narrow, graveled, country lane from the Bullein Barn B&B, Smallhythe Place was at the end of it. Everyday we…

The Dirt on the Domestics: Life with the Bloomsburys

In 1904, the Stephen’s children, Vanessa, Virginia, Thoby and Adrian, left their comfortable surroundings  in Kensington, after their parent’s death, to move to the bohemian neighborhood of Bloomsbury. Since they could no longer afford the grand house and the ten servants for four people, they chose to escape many of the rituals of the Victorian…

#MyGloriousGardens: The Charleston Farmhouse

Today we are visiting one of my favorite gardens! Won’t you join me? This challenge is brought to us by Old House In the Shires! Charleston Farmhouse, the home of Vanessa Stephen Bell, (Virginia Woolf’s sister) is about six miles from Monk’s House, (Virginia Woolf’s home) as the the crow flies. The farmhouse sits in…

Now There’s a Cornette!

I am a Registered Nurse by profession. After I graduated with a BSN from Indiana University’s, School of Nursing, the first hospital I worked at was St Vincents in Indianapolis, Indiana. It is a 1000 bed teaching hospital. There were so many good things about working at this hospital that it is ranked as the…

Color Your World: Margaret Brown

Today’s color for the challenge is Brown. Margaret “Maggie” Tobin Brown was known as the socialite on Lifeboat #6 when the  RMS Titanic sunk in 1912. Hollywood called her “Molly” Brown, but that was a made-up name that went well with her other name, unsinkable. Maggie Brown was born in a two room cabin along…

Welcome and Happy Hogmanay!

Welcome to my new blog! As you can see I have changed things up a bit! Out with the old and in with the new! I will continue to write about my travels and other passions; reading, gardening and photography, so nothing is changed in that way. Please look around to see all the new…

Christmas Foods and Traditions: The Trencher in Elizabethan Times

The 16th century was a fast-paced and fascinating time for the whole of Europe. Improvements in design of ships meant they could travel further and faster, resulting in the circumnavigation of the world. Queen Elizabeth granted Sir Walter Raleigh a Royal Charter, which authorized him to explore and colonize any “remote, heathen and barbarous countries,…

The Elizabethan Christmas and the Tale of Oranges

To continue with my Christmas Foods And Traditions Series we will look today at the Elizabethan period of England. As a queen, Elizabeth had access to some of the most luxurious foods that were on offer now from many parts of the world. Her food reflected the wealth and power of England and was an important…

Christmas Foods And Traditions: Oranges

Why Do We Put Oranges in Stockings at Christmas? 1. St. Nicholas and his sacks of gold. One explanation for this tradition stretches back hundreds of years to St. Nicholas, who was born in what is now present-day Turkey. He inherited a large sum of money, but devoted his life to helping others, and eventually…

21 Steps of Honor

The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier: What do you know about it? 1. How many steps does the guard take during his walk across the Tomb of the Unknowns and why? 21 steps. It alludes to the twenty-one gun salute, which is the highest honor given any military or foreign dignity. 2. How long does he…

Agatha Christie’s Greatest Mystery

In December 1926, Agatha Christie was a thirty-six year old, established crime writer, when she mysteriously disappeared. Early on the morning of December 3rd, Colonel Archibald Christie, an aviator in the Royal Flying Corps, had asked Agatha for a divorce because he was in love with another woman, Nancy Neele. He then packed up and…

Great Dixter Manor: Part One

This is the oldest section of Great Dixter Manor and as you can see it tips to the left! All great manors have a fascinating story to tell and Great Dixter is no exception. Nathanial Lloyd, born in Manchester, made his fortune when he founded his own color printing firm in 1893.  In 1905, he…

Pashley Manor, Ticehurst, UK

While I was touring homes and gardens of the National Trust and National Garden Scheme this year, there were also two independent gardens that were recommended to me by my hostess at the Potting Shed. One was Pashley Manor near Ticehurst in Sussex. One afternoon we made our way there……… The land was owned by…

Thursday Doors: Père LaChaise Cemetery; Paris, France

Today, I thought I would do something different for Thursday Doors. This is a video I made of Père LaChaise Cemetery in Paris, France! Lots of doors here! The cemetery is named after Father Francois de la Chaise, (1624-1709) the confessor to Louis XIV, who lived in the Jesuit house that was on the property…