Edvard Grieg Home; Troldhaugen

This morning we are going just outside the city limits of Bergen to Nordasvannen, to visit the home of Norway’s famous composer, Edvard Haverup Grieg, who was born in 1843. The bus finally came to a stop at a little lane that went up the mountain. Here we had to get out and walk the rest of the way to the house. The name of his summer house was Troldhaugen or Troll House and as you walk up the path surrounded by huge trees to one side, you can just imagine the trolls peeking out around the trees to get a glimpse of you. Grieg wrote some of his best music here and one of his most favorites, Hall of the Mountain King.…….so as we walk up the hill just click on the music at the top of the photo and you’ll get a feel for Edvard Grieg!

Edvard Grieg House Road Entrance

You can see from the sign, that the Grieg’s had quite the nice place on the mountainside. He composed here in the summers and then traveled the world in the winters doing concerts.

Edvard Grieg Museum and House

We’re getting closer!

Edvard Grieg Museum and House

Ah! Here it is at last! Isn’t it charming? Well worth the stretch of the legs in the rain!

Edvard Grieg Museum and House

and getting closer……….

Edvard Grieg Museum and House

And a view from the top…………love the grass/sod on the rooftops of the garden sheds!

Edvard Grieg Museum and House

and Edvard can still be found in the garden………..

Edvard Grieg Museum and House and Statue

It would be nice to sit here on a sunny day……but they get 260 days of rain here so this might be the most common view!

Edvard Grieg Museum and House
Edvard Grieg Museum and House

Now, let’s go in and meet the guide…….I love a guide that shares all the juicy life bits, don’t you? Edvard Grieg had lots of juicy bits………… He started playing the piano at age six and by his early teens he was extraordinary. At an early age, Ole Bull, who was a famous Norwegian violinist himself and related by marriage to Grieg, encouraged his parents to send Grieg to Leipzig Conservatory in Germany to further his studies. Ending his studies there, he stated, “I left Leipzig Conservatory just as stupid as I entered it.”  He was his own man and would make his own mark and wanted to write and promote Norwegian Folk music to represent the people of Norway. During this time Norway was part of Sweden and Sweden was known as the big fish in the pond.  Here, I must also share with you his relationship with Ole Bull, who played a significant part in Grieg’s life at the time. Ole Bull was the rock star of his day. He was famous for his concerts, not only in Europe, but the United States as well. All the women loved him and he had large followings of groupies……so Grieg liked going along and playing at these concerts as well, and they became quite the item. Ole Bull was married to a French woman,  Alexandrine Félicie Villeminoand, and together they had six children, but for the most part she stayed in Bergen with the children, as Bull made hay with all the ladies around the world. Grieg eventually thought he should marry too and he chose to marry his first cousin, Nina Hagerup. The three of them traveled together for many years ( the guide revealing there was kind of a threesome going on) Finally, Nina had had enough of the fun and games and left Grieg. To reconcile with Nina, Grieg promised her a permanent home and built, Troldhaugen, and promised to only travel with her. The end of Ole Bull.

I can’t wait to go in this house, because it is furnished as it was when the Grieg’s lived there.

Edvard Grieg Museum and House
Edvard Grieg Museum and House
Edvard Grieg Museum and House

How about that for a staircase?

Edvard Grieg Museum and House

Here is Edvard and Nina. Nina was a singer………….

Edvard Grieg Museum and House

I really liked the old photos in the house…..this one showing the landscape back in the day…..

Edvard Grieg Museum and House

And, here is Edvard Grieg in his later years at the house.

Edvard Grieg Museum and House

They liked to have concerts here too………..

Edvard Grieg Museum and House

This is how you keep the drink warmed……..

Edvard Grieg Museum and House

This house had lovely displays of a bygone time………look at the carving on those chairs!

Edvard Grieg Museum and House

I have no idea what this piece is, but I’m sure the guide must have said, and I didn’t get it written down. Do you have an idea? If you do, please, let me know……….It looks like a serving tray……….maybe for oysters? I also liked the ceramic basket of hatching chicks……Was that to hold boiled eggs?

Edvard Grieg Museum and House

Here is the silver serving tray……..similar to the other one……..

Edvard Grieg Museum and House

Plenty of space in this house………

Edvard Grieg Museum and House
Edvard Grieg Museum and House

I had to take a photo of this painting ……….I think it is the path up here, way back when………The Troll Path.

Edvard Grieg Museum and House

Walking back to the bus, we get a look of the new homes now at the bottom of the mountain……….

On the Walk to Edvard Grieg Museum and House

Perfect in every way!

On the Walk to Edvard Grieg Museum and House

Even the older ones hidden behind the gardens…..

On the Walk to Edvard Grieg Museum and House

Edvard Grieg is to Norway what Shakespeare is to England: his country’s greatest son.

Grieg died in 1907, in Bergen, on his way to a concert out of the country. The extensive touring with innumerable concerts, combined with a weak health condition, put an end to his life. He died of exhaustion. Ole Bull’s wife, Alexandrine, died in 1862 and in 1868 he married 20-year-old, Sara Chapman Thorpe, an American, he had had a relationship with since she was seventeen. Bull was sixty-three. They had two children together, but she spent most of her time in Cambridge, Massachusetts, where Bull had built a house for her. When Sara died in 1911, she left all his money to a Middle Eastern Sect and her children spent years in court trying to re-coup the money. All in all, these folks were very talented and did their own thing, making their stories more intriguing, I’d say! Just like the Hollywood folks today!

Check out Spotify to listen to the works of Edvard Grieg…….now that I have been to Troldhaugen and know more about his life there, I can just picture him writing and playing the piano there! Fabulous!

I am glad we visited Troldhaugen and learned more about Grieg and his works. Now every time I hear Hall of the Mountain King, I’ll remember walking up that mountain!

Much thanks to Kevin Macleod for letting me download the music! See you next at the pier of Bergen!

Hall of the Mountain King by Kevin MacLeod | http://incompetech.com
Music promoted by https://www.free-stock-music.com
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/deed.en_US

13 Comments Add yours

  1. Sheree says:

    Thank you for the wonderful visit and accompanying stories which certainly fleshed out the history of Lr Greig.

    Like

  2. Sheree, just a question…….I’m polling the folks, today, to see if they listen to the music when I add it, to see if it is worth the effort to add it to the posts or if it makes the posts more interesting. I may be the only one that likes it! Ha ha!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I certainly did, Cady, and I saw (rather, heard) immediately how the climbing walk up that mountain influence this particular piece. Tromp tromp tromp . . . until the pace evens out, the final arrival, celebration.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. What a beautiful house, and the treasures inside. Thank you for the tour it, I really enjoyed this

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    1. I know right? I loved this place!

      Liked by 1 person

  4. It really IS charming — and what a view! Thanks so much for sharing some of the contents of this adorable home with us — I love to see what people use as accessories. This post just makes me want to go to Norway even more.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Believe me when I say Norway has something to offer everyone! If you you like scenery, this is the place, If you like to be left alone to enjoy the scenery this is the place. If you want a thriving, beautiful, spotless city with all the shops, cafes, museums and more, Oslo is where you want to be! If you have always wanted a goat farm on a mountain in the middle of nowhere Norway is the place for you! Add to that all the beautiful scenic fjords and some of the most physically beautiful men and women and children in the world, then Norway is for you. I have so much much more to share Stay tuned!

    Liked by 1 person

  6. That tall white ceramic piece is an elaborate tiered serving tray with cupped retainers for fruits or candies. I’ve not seen any quite this elaborate except in an article in one of the older Victoria magazines. My husband thought it was a fountain! Well, that would be the design source, I reckon. It appears to be made to disassemble for easier cleaning and/or storage. Fascinating piece. The whole house is fascinating.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yes, it definitely came apart! I could see little tea cakes on that tray or fruit yes!

      Like

  7. Love the house and the view, but rain that many days wouldn’t be my cup of tea. Mind you, now that we live in the desert and average 9″ of rain per year, they could sent me a bit now and then. 🙂 I’d love to see the house with a less cluttered, more modern casual look. I bet it would be wonderful.

    janet

    Liked by 1 person

  8. I would not like all that rain either, but the folks of Bergen just plow on as if it is nothing, and it isn’t to them! The house was complete with items of the Victorian Age and all of it was quite interesting, since I don’t often get to see those things.

    Like

  9. Susan K. Hagen says:

    Wonderfully charming house and great post! And the music was perfect.

    Like

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