Thursday Door: The Antebellum Era

Good Morning TD friends! It’s been so beautiful and warm and the leaves are beginning to change color, so it’s time for a roadtrip!  Today, we are traveling to Roswell, Georgia, just a few miles from Atlanta, to look at the antebellum properties and there are plenty to see. I was hoping to get some photos of really good doors here, but most of these properties were plantations at one one time and sit a far piece from the main road! And, then there is the long driveway to it! So, as my title suggests, I have what I call a Thursday Door. I have lots of little doors and One Good Close Up Door!

First, we went to the visitors center and got the map of Roswell and found the closest (within walking) properties. I noticed these big homes were called Halls.  Hall was a British term that meant a large country house, especially one with an estate.  In 1830, Roswell King, a wealthy land owner from coastal Georgia was riding back from a business trip when he came upon the roaring  Vickery Creek and land he thought would be good to grow cotton on, right beside it. He could not get that land out of his mind and when the Cherokee Nation was moved out, the land was sold by lottery to white men. In 1832, King bought all the property from the men, who had bought it through the lottery and brought Negros from his plantation in the South, to construct a cotton mill, the Hall, the slaves quarters, the mill quarters and all the buildings in the town. King encouraged other plantation owners to move there too and invest in the mills.

Today, you can tour two of the Halls of the founding fathers. Barrington Hall is the home of Barrington King, son of Roswell King, and the other is the Smith Plantation, home of Archibald Smith. The third Hall is Bulloch Hall, the childhood home of President Theodore Roosevelt’s mother, Mittie Bulloch. All are open to the public and you will learn how all three founding families and the rest of the larger planters made up the “Roswell District.” So, let’s go up the hill to the Hall at the top!

Barrington Hall, Roswell, Georgia
Barrington Hall, Roswell, Georgia

I had to stroll the gardens too.

Barrington Hall, Roswell, Georgia
Barrington Hall, Roswell, Georgia
Barrington Hall, Roswell, Georgia

This was the smoke house at Barrington Hall.

Barrington Hall, Roswell, Georgia

This brick structure close to the Hall was the Ice House, where they also took their baths in Summer………….

Barrington Hall, Roswell, Georgia
The Ice House, Barrington Hall, Roswell, Georgia
The Ice House, Barrington Hall, Roswell, Georgia
The Ice House, Barrington Hall, Roswell, Georgia
The Ice House, Barrington Hall, Roswell, Georgia

Walking down the hill and down a long street and then up a long driveway……we came to Bulloch Hall.

Bulloch Hall, Roswell, Georgia

Read the sign and take it all in…………there will  be a quiz at the end. Ha Ha!

Bulloch Hall, Roswell, Georgia
Bulloch Hall, Roswell, Georgia
Bulloch Hall, Roswell, Georgia
Bulloch Hall, Roswell, Georgia

and their gardens looked like this……..

Bulloch Hall, Roswell, Georgia

A group of volunteers was at both Halls that day tidying the gardens.

Bulloch Hall, Roswell, Georgia
Bulloch Hall, Roswell, Georgia

Off the main street to Bulloch Hall was this smaller property, but just as important.

W J Dolvin House, Roswell, Georgia

Jimmy Carter’s Roswell Whitehouse. I really liked this place. It looked doable.

W J Dolvin House, Roswell, Georgia

Following Mimosa Street we walked along what I would call Church Row. Churches, churches and more churches with large mansions thrown in too. Be sure to read all the signs. They tell you who owned what. Most of these mansions are now used for wedding venues. They would all make a lovely place for a wedding reception!

Primrose Cottage, Roswell, Georgia
Primrose Cottage, Roswell, Georgia
Primrose Cottage, Roswell, Georgia
Great Oaks, Roswell, Georgia
Great Oaks, Roswell, Georgia

Then we came to Canton Street. One restaurant after another and all unique in their fare…..

Canton Street, Roswell, Georgia

and ta-da, my one good door!

Canton Street, Roswell, Georgia

As we walked along the streets we met the residents of Roswell too……..

Residents of Canton Street, Roswell, Georgia
Residents of Canton Street, Roswell, Georgia
Residents of Canton Street, Roswell, Georgia

And I’m showing one small house to show not all the homes are Halls here!

Canton Street, Roswell, Georgia

I hope you enjoyed our walk through Historic Roswell……we are headed over to the old cotton mill, known as the Roswell Manufacturing Company, to see how well the mill fared. Won’t you join us ? See you there!

PS My featured photo was taken in Atlanta, where we spent a week! My what a difference in these two places!

Look here to see what others are doing for Norm’s Doors!

It’s easy to do Norm’s Doors. Photograph some doors and post them to Thursday Doors on Thursday!

PS All photos were taken on our IPhones …….we are traveling lighter!

14 Comments Add yours

  1. Tara says:

    Very nice. Thanks for the tour!

    Like

  2. Junieper2 says:

    Oh my dear, you even travel to the USA. It’s interesting, because I have lived here on this side of the ocean for 30+ years, and I have only been to “the South” for conferences, but never “visited” all these beautiful places.The ice house is particularly interesting! Had to smile about the Church Row – all in the same street! Only in America:):)

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Juniper I live in the US, but I definitely have my favorite cities! Atlanta is right up there with Charleston!

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Librarylady says:

    Hi Cady, This is a great tour of places I’d otherwise never see. No surprise, I like the ice house best. For some reason, rustic just resonates with me. Also beautiful photo of the leafy archway.

    Like

  4. Thanks for the great tour 🙂 these homes are something else

    Like

  5. TCast says:

    Interesting story behind your post.

    Like

  6. Norm 2.0 says:

    Some stately old properties indeed. I can see many of them being ideal spots for wedding receptions.
    Thanks for the fun and informative tour 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Jo Shafer says:

    I’m just now reading your Thursday post (somehow missed it earlier). You made my old Southern heart flutter with lovely nostalgia! Primrose Cottage reminded me of a neighboring estate where I grew up in Pensacola, but I don’t think it had a name other than the “[name]’s house.” They used to smoke their own hams, a couple of which were our Christmas dinners. Do you know whether these antebellum halls are occupied today, or are they museums, only?

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    1. Jo, today in Roswell the “three” big plantation homes are museum quality and on tour. The rest of the antebellum homes have been carefully and dutifully restored and are used by businesses as wedding venues. They are one after another on Canton Street sprinkled between the antebellum churches! I have been without electricity since Monday due to a break in our electrical power from the main connection to “The End Cottage.” I am also in the throws of a complete kitchen and LR re-model! Posts will be sporadic for a while!

      Like

      1. Not to worry. Remodel away to your heart’s content — or is it frustrations — then tell us all about your renewals. We’ve been there, done that, little by little for years. Just finished having the exterior of our house repaired and repainted, a month’s nuisance but now just right in grey with white woodwork. It’ll be a stand-out in winter snows. Speaking of which, will you and Hubby in the path of this early blizzard sweeping across from the Rockies?

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  8. Not really my style, but so much interesting history and I love the gardens.

    janet

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  9. My husbands family once had a Georgia farm. I’d love to see where it was someday. And I want to sit in on Jimmy Carter’s Sunday School class. Both may be too late to experience if I’m not quick enough. Loved the tour 🙂

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    1. Yes, I love Georgia! It is a beautiful state and there is tons to see and do in Atlanta!

      Like

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