Thursday Doors: Tucson, Arizona

Today we’ll see the wild, wild West and learn a little of the history of Tucson, Arizona, starting with some street art as the featured photo!

Today, Tucson is a blend of hip, Spanish, and cowboy…….  First the civilized side.

The Old Pueblo Trolley Museum, Tucson, AZ
The Old Pueblo Trolley Museum, Tucson, AZ
Trolley Car Museum, Tucson, Arizona
Old Pueblo Trolley Museum, Tucson, Arizona

Want to know how people got around Tucson? Visit the Old Pueblo Trolley Museum!

Pueblo Trolley Museum
Old Pueblo Trolley Museum
Old Pueblo Trolley Museum
Old Pueblo Trolley Museum
Old Pueblo Trolley Museum
Old Pueblo Trolley Museum

The first public transportation in Tucson was the herdic service started by Bill Morgan in 1879.  The herdic is a closed-body horse drawn carriage with a rear entrance and seating for eight on either side.  The route started downtown and ran to Nine Mile Water Hole, a local stage coach stop.

The first street railway started on September 9th, 1897, as Tucson Street Railway.  It used two mule-drawn cars having seats in rows for sixteen or the herdic carriage.

From 1898 to 1900, the streetcar ran a line from the Southern Pacific Depot to the University of Arizona campus. Service was expanded between 1902 and 1904 to include an extension along the north side of the University of Arizona and additional routes south to Elysian Grove, which was a 25 acre park noted for its floral displays, amusement park and man-made lake.

By 1904 there was an inventory of seven cars, 8 1/4 miles of track, and 34 mules or horses.  Horse cars ran in Tucson for eight years and were unreliable as schedules were at the mercy of the animals.

Electric streetcars began operating in Tucson by 1906 as a replacement for horse-mule streetcars. By 1930 electric streetcars were no more.

Now let’s take our walk along Broadway, down 4th Avenue to Stone Avenue to Congress Street. What will we see along the way?

Cathedral of St Augustine, Tucson, AZ
Cathedral of St Augustine, Tucson, AZ

In 1858 the St Augustine Cathedral began as a two-room house in the newly acquired territory of Arizona. Were they trying to tame the West?

Cathedral of St Augustine, Tucson, AZ
Cathedral of St Augustine, Tucson, AZ

But, going back to Tucson’s roots, we see places like the Surly Wench Pub too!

Along the Walk in Tucson, AZ
Along the Walk in Tucson, AZ
Along the Walk in Tucson, AZ
Along the Walk in Tucson, AZ

Everything is very colorful in the desert under a very blue, blue sky!

Along the Walk in Tucson, AZ
Along the Walk in Tucson, AZ
Along the Walk in Tucson, AZ
Along the Walk in Tucson, AZ
Along the Walk in Tucson, AZ
Along the Walk in Tucson, AZ
Along the Walk in Tucson, AZ
Along the Walk in Tucson, AZ

This is The Hut, a watering hole for thirsty travelers?

The Hut
The Hut
The Hut
The Hut

I get the feeling Tucson is still a wild and wooly place. In the past………

Arizona was home to the Earp Brothers. Morgan Earp was an Arizona Special Policeman when he helped his brothers Virgil and Wyatt and Doc Holliday confront the outlaw “Cowboys” in the Gunfight at the O.K. Corral on October 26, 1881.  All three Earp brothers had been the target of repeated death threats made by the Cowboys, who were upset by the Earps’ interference in their illegal activities

In 1882, Morgan Earp was playing billiards when a group of men fired into the hall and mortally wounded him. Three doctors tried to save him to no avail. The group of men were implicated by Cowboy Pete Spence’s wife, Marietta, at the coroner’s inquest of the shooting. The coroner’s jury concluded that Spence, Frank Stilwell, Frederick Bode, and Florentino “Indian Charlie” Cruz were the prime suspects in the assassination of Morgan Earp.  Deputy U.S. Marshal Wyatt Earp gathered a few trusted friends and accompanied Virgil Earp and his family as they traveled to Benson for a train ride to California. They found Stilwell lying in wait for Virgil in the Tucson station and killed him on the tracks.  After killing Stilwell, Wyatt deputized others and rode on a vendetta, killing three more “Cowboys” over the next few days before leaving the state. Ye Haw! 

This is just one of many photos in the Thursday Door Collection featured by Norm2.0!   Won’t you join in or take a peak at all the doors?

 

13 Comments Add yours

  1. GeorgieMoon says:

    I enjoyed reading your post! Great photos, and interesting info. I’d definitely like to visit. The Surly Wench Saloon sounds a hoot!

    Like

  2. Norm 2.0 says:

    Love those old trolleys! And yes, I do like my wenches surly 😀
    Wonderful post!

    Like

  3. Sherry Felix says:

    I enjoyed your post. This is a sad side of Tucson: When I passed through Tucson many years ago I stopped at a store selling Native American jewelry and listened to the owner talking down to the NA people. He bought their lovely work for pennies. I also witnessed other racist acts that made me angry. Two NA people were turned away out of a dinner. A car passing NA people jeered at them and threw a can at them. Racisms still exists. All that occurred during my 4 hours there. The reservations are usually dismal places. An article on reservations today: http://www.nativepartnership.org/site/PageServer?pagename=naa_livingconditions

    Like

  4. Fantastic photos and I loved the history, thanks.

    Like

  5. Thanks for the great tour. I really like the house you featured. The old West really was rather wild! I just got back from Mesa (suburb of Phoenix) where the weather was wild for them: rain, cold, and wind the first few days. But my parents and I had our usual great time and now I’m back where it’s really cold! 🙂

    janet

    Like

  6. Nice post; really liked the wall mural on the side panel.

    Like

    1. Lots of color to be found in the desert!

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s