Thursday Doors: The Cotswolds, UK

Chipping Campden Village Hall
Chipping Campden Village Hall

Happy New Year from the doorkeeper here! I’ve been wiping down the door, getting the cobwebs away and oiling those rusty hinges from the old blog’s doors! So you are entering a brand new Painted Door! (or Blog) I hope you like the new site, let me know! If you followed my old blog, and want to follow me still, you must re-follow this blog because it is entirely separate from the older blog. The names are very similar, but the sites are totally different. Once you look at them on a computer you will notice quite a difference. Now for today’s doorscursion!

Everyone who visits the UK wants to visit the Cotswolds! All those quaint cottages and tiny little hamlets are just made to be photographed. I kinda feel sorry for the folks that live there. Notice how I said kinda! I read an article about how the village folks feel about tourists coming to their village. Their biggest complaint were people tramping into their gardens, back porches, etc. to get a better photograph. They also hated seeing their cottages featured on everyone’s Christmas cards! Now, who wouldn’t want to live in this thatched cottage, I ask? I actually think it is now two residences separated by a big hedge! The wool trade was responsible for the prosperity of the Cotswolds, but it’s character is a result of an abundance of stone. 

Cottage in the Cotswolds
Cottage in the Cotswolds

Or you could have a door surrounded in hollyhocks……………

Cottage in the Cotswolds
Cottage in the Cotswolds

We can go to the Rose Cottages, Chipping House,  Old Poplars Farmhouse or Leysgarth!

It's a Sign
It’s a Sign

Or we can visit the row of blue doors………..

The Blue Doors
The Blue Doors

The wool trade was responsible for the prosperity of the Cotswolds, but it’s character is a result of an abundance of stone. In a Cotswold house, almost everything is constructed from the stone, including the roof tiles. In the past almost every village had a quarry of some sort.  Stone blocks would be cut in the winter, which would then, in freezing conditions, split and open like oyster shells, to be pulled apart and set aside to be used as roof tiles. On the roof itself, a wooden framework is crafted and the tiles, via a hole pierced at their weakest point, hung on the battens. Just to let you know, I didn’t tramp or trespass to get these photos, but I did think Chipping Campden was one of the best places in the Cotswolds. I spent a week in a stone cottage (the Featured Cottage) and explored the village, churches and countryside. The stone is very noteworthy. The color of the stone (Oolitic Limestone) is determined by which quarry it came from. Those quarries farther to the north produced the honey colored yellow stone and quarries further south produced a silvery gray colored stone with a kiss of yellow.

Blue Barn Door
Blue Barn Door

The Eadburgha Church in Ebrington shows off both colors of the stone found in the Cotswolds.

St Eadburgha Church, Ebrington, UK
St Eadburgha Church, Ebrington, UK

The sidewalk to St James Church in Chipping Campden is lined with old tombstones! This huge medieval church seems daunting in such a small village. The rich wool traders wanted to show off their wealth and decided building this church would be the best way to do that! It is impossible not to notice the majestic and elegant tower of the church, that soars above the town from almost every viewpoint. Until the Reformation the church was known as St. Catherine’s, and is one of the finest ‘wool’ churches in all England. Each of the twelve lime trees leading from the main entrance represents one of the apostles. They date from 17th century.

St James Church, Chipping Campden, UK
St James Church, Chipping Campden, UK
St James Church
St James Church
Butty's the Old Bakehouse
Butty’s Old Bakehouse

The definition of a folly is; “the lack of good sense or something that lies in the eyes of the beholder.”  Follies have no purpose other than a foolish act.  Often they are a building constructed with a particular purpose such as a castle or tower, but this appearance is a sham or the intended purpose may be disguised! And in the middle of this meadow we find………..

The Broadway Folly
The Broadway Folly

And here is a Cotswold wall, no mortar required.

The Cotswold Wall
The Cotswold Wall

And another mossy wall with giant ferns in front of a Cotswold hidden door!

The Hidden Doors of the Cotswolds
The Hidden Door of the Cotswolds

Well I hope you have enjoyed are stroll through the Cotswolds today!

This is just one of many photos in the Thursday Door Collection featured by Norm2.0!   Won’t you join in or take a peak at all the doors?

 

 

 

 

18 Comments Add yours

  1. GeorgieMoon says:

    Fabulous photos as usual! I went to school in the Cotswolds and my old school buildings were part of a 16th century Manor House in exactly the same coloured stone.

    Like

  2. Sherry Felix says:

    Charming place and lovely doors.

    Like

  3. carol1945 says:

    Being American, and loving English literature, of course, I had to go to the Cotswolds on my first trip to the U.K. I was there about 25 years ago, and really, we were the only tourists there during the weekdays. Has that changed? Your photos are simply wonderful and I am going to sign up for your blog. Norm’s door blog is a good way to find others.

    Like

    1. Thank you Carol! Yes, I have found many new friends on the Thursday door site. It is always so interesting to see what other people are doing! We go to the UK at least once a year and to places well off the beaten track for most Americans.

      Like

  4. Gorgeous homes and doors! My favorite is the large stone home with the blue doors.
    Donna

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Who would have thought that those bold colored doors would look so good!

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Vicky says:

    Oh, so English, just lovely, you feel at peace walking through the shots. Interesting about the roof tiles and some lovely doors too.

    Like

  6. Lovely tour! I especially liked the row with blue doors.

    Like

  7. All gorgeous. Period. 🙂 I like your new blog theme. Maybe it will encourage me to try a few new ones that are more photo-friendly. I’ve seen this one several times and really like it.

    janet

    Like

    1. Thank you Janet! I love this theme and the way it turned out! Well worth the effort!

      Like

  8. Norm 2.0 says:

    What a delightful post. You captured the old-time charm of this picturesque community beautifully. Bravo!

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Gillian says:

    I love all of your Cotswold doors Cady especially the lovely blue doors of the cottages and barn opposite Snowshill Manor. We were there last spring and I posted my pictures on Instagram if you want to have a look. https://www.instagram.com/countrygardenuk Are you on Instagram? Let me know if you are and I’ll follow you there too!

    Like

    1. Gillian I looked at some of your photos on Instagram and will look into that more. I do not do Instagram and this year I gave up Facebook and Twitter also! So much to do so little time! But, I will check out your pictures of the Cotswolds.

      Like

      1. PS I love your garden sheds! If I lived in the UK I’d have to have one! One more reason I need a spot there!

        Like

  10. Great captures of this place. I would like to visit this place someday.

    Like

    1. It is a lovely area of the UK!

      Like

  11. jazzytower says:

    So much to love on this post! Especially if you’re into English Lit and period pieces. Love the stone wall, now I want to build one:) That Broadway Folly is something. I wonder what’s in there, do you think anyone lives there? Now I want to go there:) The poor residents, they seem to be putting up with a lot. Thanks for sharing this:)

    Pat

    Like

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